Lab Report 365 – 31/01/16

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#31 ONE of the best movements YOU should be doing as an ATHLETE

What is the key fundamental for jumping higher/longer or running faster (apart from technique obviously, duh.)?

Rapid/violent “TRIPLE EXTENSION”

By this I mean hip extension, knee extension and ankle plantar flexion.

So what does this actually mean?

Basically we are talking hip hinge mechanics. There is no doubt that to get better at jumping/running your need to do it, and have a coach that understands how to coach the techniques and prioritize motor control development for landing patterns etc. But in order to develop the physiological and neurological attributes of power and speed you need to specifically train this.

A coach must understand rate of force development (ROFD) amongst other training variables to even stand a chance of improving these physiological and neurological qualities. What I mean is:
Do you understand eccentric loading?
Do you understand the stretch shortening cycle?
Do you understand rapid concentric contractions?
Do you know how to correct an athlete’s mechanics for compensatory patterns they have developed from years of incorrect training in regards to generating force?

If you do understand these and know how to use variables correctly then you should have you or your athletes using exercises such as:

POWER CLEAN FROM BLOCKS
(OR clean pull from blocks for less advanced athletes)
(only experienced coaches should teach this not, people who just watch YouTube)

The reason you need this is, look at the angle of the hip at the start position of the movement from the blocks. This is very similar to the forward lean when an athlete initially accelerates when running. As the athlete accelerates the posterior chain, in particular glutes, hamstrings and calves rapidly contract causing the violent triple extension we talked about earlier.

Doing this movement for reps and with little to no rest WILL NOT develop the qualities we are talking about. Doing this for 2-5 reps for 8-3 sets with sub maximal load emphasizing quality of movement and bar speed, with adequate rest intervals (over 60 seconds depending on load and standard of athlete) will improve you or the athlete’s ability to generate greater force therefore increasing the chance of jumping higher/running faster.

You must understand that in this gym based exercise we are training the physiological and neurological qualities that improve power/speed that’ll only help so much if your technique (for jumping/running) is rubbish.

For more info:
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Cam Burnside – B.App.Sci (HONS)

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Lab Report 365 – 30/01/16

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#30 Hip Band Distraction (Hamstring & Hip Flexor)

Description
Having adequate hip flexion is critical for developing stability, strength and power through the lower body and hip hinge patterning (running/jumping/change of direction). Without adequate hip hinge ability Squatting/deadlifting mechanics becoming extremely difficult, and can put the spine in a compromised position to not only impede power output but also increase rick of injury.

Execution
Hamstring Band Distraction: Set the band up on a squat rack at hip height. Put one leg in the band and step forward with the same leg (facing away from the band). Perform a hip hinge, keeping neutral spine. Floss to the tight corners before moving on.
Behind the knee and lean over like a sprint start and floss to all corners again.

Hip Flexor Distraction: Set the band up at knee height. Put one leg in the band and lunge back down onto one knee (facing the band). Set pelvis to neutral (posterior pelvic tilt) and brace abs. Floss to tight corners again.
Lunge forward on a 45 degree angle externally rotate at the hip on the front leg and push down on the band. Ensure to posterior tilt the pelvis again.

Purpose
Creating space in the hip and improving hip flexion of an athlete will translate to better training/performance. This will also make the athlete more durable, therefore being able to train longer and yield better results.

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Cam Burnside – B.App.Sci (HONS)

Lab Report 365 – 29/01/16

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#29 Quick Fixes for your Deadlift

1.Be meticulous with your start position. Ensure you maintain tension.
2.Shins touch the bar for Sumo. Bar over the knot of your shoelace for conventional.
3. “Low bar” squat to the bar to grasp the bar. Don’t allow your knees to slide forward.
4.Grasp bar. Roll shoulders “Up, back, and down” to create upper back tension.
5.Head back. Drive through your heels and push the floor away.

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This our Hero Liao Hui. 69kg World Olympic Weightlifting Holder.

Lab Report – 365 28/01/16

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#28 Mechanical Analysis: Levers, angles and forces during a squat
STRENGTH SCIENCE SEMINAR PREVIEW

The mechanical analysis of the squat concerns the development of rotational forces throughout the range of motion. This force (called moment force), increases as the barbell moves horizontally away from one’s body joint. That distance is called a moment arm. Think about holding a weight with your arms. Imagine doing a front raise with this weight. The higher you raise your arms, the greater the force is in your shoulder joint (moment force), because the weight is getting further away from your shoulder joint horizontally (moment arm).

Apply this knowledge to the squat, especially in the case of a high bar vs. a low bar squat. When analyzing a squat, you must look at all of the levers. The easiest way to think of the levers is to think of the joints. There is the Back, the Hip (Femur), the Knee, and the Ankle (Shank). When performing a High Bar Back Squat, the torso angle remains in fairly upright position, meaning that the hips don’t travel as far posteriorly. However in order to descend further, the knees will travel further anteriorly. If we take into consideration the moment arm in the knee (travelling anterior or knees forward over toes), you are increasing the moment force in the knee. Using our knowledge of anatomy, you will realize that a high bar back squat is a knee/Quadriceps dominant exercise.

A low bar back squat is the opposite. The hip moment arm travels further backwards, whilst the shank/shins stay relatively vertical, making the low bar back squat a more Hip/Posterior Chain dominant exercise.

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Lab Report 365 – 27/01/16

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#27: Conjugate Training- Periodastion model

Part 2

This system uses a VERY Different form of periodization to typical western styles (western block periodization). In the conjugate system multiple training qualities are focuses on at one time.

In the conjugate system we typically focus on:
On Max effort and Dynamic days:
Quickness
Explosiveness
Speed-strength
Strength-speed
Absolute strength

Extra workouts focus on
Plyometrics
Stability
Mobility
General Physical Preparedness (GPP)
Specific Physical Preparedness (SPP)

Sound like all qualities we want to develop with athlete’s right?

This is typically said to be an ineffective way to train as it wont develop any training quality fully. This maybe true however if you’re constantly improving in every area wouldn’t that lead to better performance in the long run especially including a peak/peaking phase for competition (I’ll cover more on training qualities in the future).

Periodization typically runs in a 3-week pendulum wave, with 4 main sessions per week
2 x MAXIMAL EFFORT (typically lower/upper 72 hours rest in-between)
2 x DYNAMIC EFFORT (typically lower/upper 72 hours rest in-between)
Then “extra-workouts” or conditioning and extra week point training is done outside of these workouts on adjacent days. These are typically easier to recover from and shouldn’t take away from the main training sessions and the focus is on improving GPP and Jumping.

After a 3-week wave the cycle is started again remembering to continue to cycle exercises on ME day to avoid acclimatization and overtraining the CNS by hitting above 90% of 1RM in the same exercise.

We have to remember that especially for athletes the LONG-TERM development is the key, we cant just say “in six weeks you’ll be trained enough to have a successful career” we need to develop these athletes to have LONG and SUCCESSFUL careers.

For more info:
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Cam Burnside – B.App.Sci (HONS)

Lab Report 365 – 26/01/16

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#26: Exercise Library – Close Grip Bench Press (Brief)

Description
The Close Grip (CG) Bench Press is an assistance exercise that focuses on the development of strength through the Shoulder Girdle in the Horizontal Adduction movement.

Execution
Lie supine on a bench. Create the braced arch position. Un-rack the bar from the rack over the chest using a wide overhand grip. The hands are positioned shoulder width or slightly narrower. The bar is then positioned the bar in line approximately with the Axilla (arm pits).

Lower the weight until the bar comes in contact with the chest. Press the bar upwards until the arms are fully extended.

Purpose
The Close Grip Bench Press is designed to develop strength through the shoulder girdle and develop hypertrophy through the Pectoralis Major and Anterior Deltoids Muscle groups. In addition, this lift changes the mechanical requirements of the pressing motion, creating a longer lever. This is a more demanding position for the shoulder girdle and thus creating a higher stability requirement.

Exercise Classification
Function:
Assistance exercise

Mechanics:
Compound exercise

Force:
Push (Horizontal)

Muscles:

Target
Pectoralis Major, Sternal Head

Synergists
Pectoralis Major, Clavicular Head
Anterior Deltoids
Triceps Brachii

Dynamic Stabilisers
Biceps Brachii, Short Head

Stabilisers
Infraspinatus

Antagonist Stabilisers
Middle Trapezius
Latissimus Dorsi

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Cam Burnside – B.App.Sci (HONS)

Lab Report – 365 25/01/16

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#25: Power or Strength: what is more important?

Look, then human body is not a yes or no machine. It is an adaptive/survival machine. This means that whatever you do, your body will adapt. So if you train power, you will get more powerful. If you train strength, you will get stronger. If you don’t train you become deconditioned (you adapt to being lazy).
BUT, do not misinterpret this message. There are ways you can maximise your development in each of these areas. A more important question to ask is what happens to power if you remove exercises of training loads that target strength development? A very basic understanding of physics will allow you to answer that question.
Power= Work/Time
or
Power = (Force x Displacement)/Time
or
Power = Force x Velocity
This essentially means that power is how much work you can do in a certain amount of time. Force essentially means strength (it is more complex than this but for the sake of keeping things short, I’ll leave it at that). Work is how much Mass was lifted in a given time. (Not sitting at a desk refreshing your Instagram feed).
This means the greater the Force, the greater the potential for power. So if you remove strength exercises from a training program, you essentially remove to potential to develop a greater expression of power. It doesn’t mean you won’t become more powerful, it means you won’t be as powerful as what you could be.
What about the other side of the coin? Can you only train strength to get more powerful? Yes and no. The answer is similar to above; the potential to apply high velocity to bar decreases. It doesn’t mean you’re not powerful, it means you’re limiting your potential for power expression by only training slowly.
What does this mean? That’s what she SAID – Specific Adaptation to Imposed Demands. Train what is required. In an athletic setting, it is what the athlete needs first. You need to know your athlete. If they have a solid foundation in mobility, proprioception, stability, and motor control, with reasonable strength, a Mixed Method Training approach will work. Use both strength and power principles to develop your athlete.
So in conclusion to answer the above question, Strength or Power: what is more important? Train strength to maximise your potential for power expression, then train fast to utilise that power.

For more info:
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