9 Week FREE Deadlift Program

Website: www.aplabs.com.au

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9-week-deadlift-program

High Volume – Low Frequency;

1 x per week  (Cube Style) deadlift cycle

Are you;

A crossfit athlete / olympic weightlifter or strength enthusiast that needs a bigger pull / deadlift?

Below is 9 weeks of deadlift training we designed utilising a structure made popular by Brandon Lilly (Cube Method) which uses principles of;

1 x Heavy day, 1 x Speed (light) day, 1 x Repetition day.

This means that over a three week cycle you will deadlift “heavy” once followed by a week of “speed” or lighter work and finish with a “repetition” or volume focus.

This is something that can work really well added into an existing program, and many variations can be used of this.

My advice in using this program would be;

Day 1: Lower (deadlift)

Day 2: Upper Body

Day 3: Lower (squat)

Day 4: Upper Body

*Even if you’re a crossfit athlete this is a simple way to cycle it through, adjusting metcons accordingly/ or add it in where it fits best.

Week 1: Heavy
Deadlift
5 x 2 @ 85%

Deficit (2’) Deadlift
5 x 3 @ 65%

GHR
3 x 10

Back extension (weighted)
3 x 15 (2 count pause at the top)

Week 2: Explosive
Deadlift
8 x 3 @ 60% (+15-20% bands or chains)

Pause (2” off floor) Deadlift
5 x 5 @ 65%
Belt Squat
4 x 8

Pull ups
50 total reps

Week 3: Volume
Deadlift
3 x 10-12 @ 70%

Block Pulls
3 x 3 @ 80%

Belt Squats
4 x 15

GHR (weighted)
3 x 5

Week 4: Heavy
Deadlift
3-4 x 2 @ 90%

Deficit (2”) Deadlift
4 x 4 @ 65%

GHR
3 x 10

Back extension (weighted)
3 x 20 (2 count pause at the top)

 
Week 5: Explosive
Deadlift
8 x 3 @ 70% (+10-15% bands or chains)

Pause (2” off floor) Deadlift
6 x 3 @ 70%

Belt Squat
4 x 8

Pull ups
50 total reps

 

Week 6: Volume
Deadlift
3-4 x 6-8 @ 80%

Block Pulls
4 x 3 @ 84%

Belt Squats
3 x 15

GHR (weighted)
3 x 5

Week 7: Heavy
Deadlift
1 x 2 @ 90%
1 x 1 @ 92.5%
1 x 1 @ 95%
1 x 1+ @ 80% (AMRAP)

Deficit (2”) Deadlift
3 x 5 @ 65%

GHR
3 x 10

Back extension (weighted)
3 x 20 (2 count pause at the top)

 
Week 8: Explosive
Deadlift
8 x 3 @ 75% (+10-15% bands or chains)

Pause (2” off floor) Deadlift
6 x 3 @ 70%

Belt Squat
4 x 15

Pull ups
50 total reps

 

Week 9: Volume
Deadlift
3-4 x 4-6 @ 85%

Block Pulls
3 x 3 @ 88%

Belt Squats
5x 12

GHR (weighted)
3 x 5

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What’s in your Program?

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No matter the goal the variables below are a must in your training program.

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Here are some of the most common terms in S&C defined.

Volume
This is how much work you have done or about to do for a specific exercise, session, block, or year. It is usually defined as sets and reps for a specific exercise, group of muscles, or session. Weight/tonnage is also factored in. For example, if you Deadlift 100kg 5 times, the volume for that set is 500kg. If you do that for 5 sets, the Volume/Tonnage would be 2500kg.

Intensity
This is defined as the amount of weight you can lift in relation to your 1-rep max (The maximum weight you can lift on a particular exercise). E.g. If you can Squat 100kg for your 1-rep max, and you lift 75kg for your first set, the intensity for that set is 75%.

This is an essential component to program design and implementation. Without this data you are exercising and not training.

Tempo
This describes the timing of three different phases of a lift/rep. Eccentric, Amortisation, and Concentric phases. This is expressed as three numbers.
E.g. 4-1-2. To perform a squat with this tempo, you would lower yourself to the bottom of the squat over 4 seconds, pause for 1 second in the bottom of the squat, and then stand up for 1 second.

Absolute Strength
This is the maximum amount of force that your muscles and produce in single contraction under involuntary conditions. It is extremely difficult to achieve in normal settings, including 1-rep max attempts. Absolute strength usually appears in life or death situations.

Maximum Strength
This is the amount of force your muscles can produce under voluntary conditions. This is most commonly measured through 1 rep max testing.

Relative Strength
This is the maximum amount of force your muscles can produce under voluntary conditions in relation to your body mass. E.g. you have two athletes. One weight 85kg the other weighs 77kg. The 85kg athlete can squat 200kg, the 77kg athlete can squat 190kg.

The 85kg athlete can more weight showing that they have more maximal strength (squatting 2.35 times their bodyweight) whereas the 77kg athlete squat 2.47 times their body weight, producing more force relative to their body weight.

Rate of Force Development
The speed you can reach max strength/force production. The faster your RFD, the more powerful you are. This is crucial to almost every sport.

 

Note: Obviously these may not always be present in every training session but these are some foundations that training is built upon.

Pause Squats: Worth it or Wasteful?

 

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It is worth it. It is as simple as that.

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Instagram: @ascension_performance_labs / @cam.j.burnside

With the advent of modern strength and conditioning, the options for use for these marvelous inventions are ever expanding, especially for the humble squat. From grip, bar position, and stance, to adding chains, bands and boxes, the squat has near limitless modification options. However, there is one modification that I find myself returning to and programming on a regular basis for all of my athletes; the pause squat.

This simple modification is adding a pause or a stop at the bottom range of a squat i.e. below parallel (N.B. It is not bad for your knees. IF you squat like shit it is bad for your knees. I don’t want to get bogged down by the logistics of squat depth in this conversation. That is a topic for another blog).

You can perform any type of squat with this modification of the timing variable: overhead, kettle bell, dumbbell, goblet, front, back, etc.: my personal favourites being the latter two. With whatever squat variation you are using, using good form, you squat to your bottom range, maintain your balance and stability (tension/”core activation”) and come to a complete stop. It is at this point you choose the amount of time you pause. Between 1-3 seconds you can still make use of the muscles’ stretch-shortening cycle, however if you pause any longer (e.g. 4 – 7 sec) you will completely remove this reflex entirely. The length of your pause should directly relate to your goal, as with any programming choice you make.

Purposes of the pause squat are numerous.

  • Firstly, it helps train rate of force development. As mentioned the before, pauses around 3-5 seconds eliminates the stretch-shortening cycle/reflex and thus you will rely less on the muscles’ elastic properties and use more contractility (generating more force as opposed to momentum).
  • Secondly, pause squatting will improve trunk strength, postural strength, and improve flexibility and comfort in the bottom of a squat. This will also lead to improvements and corrections of movement deficits in squats such as leading with the hips or collapsing the chest.
  • Thirdly, there is a high transferability of training effects to other lifts, in particular, Olympic lifts. Olympic lifts require the athlete to drop extremely low to receive the weight, recover and stand up. Pause squatting replicates the sensation of being “in the hole” and greatly assists in the recovery phase of the lift. On top of that, awareness of balance will dramatically increase. By performing pause squats, an athlete will become highly sensitive to where the weight is transferring to in their feet. This means they will develop a sense of the weight coming too far onto the toes or on the heels and thus be able to correct it. At Ascension Performance Labs, our athletes have seen their Deadlift PB’s dramatically increase by performing pause squats.
  • Finally (for this article only), there is a high transferability of training effects to sports in general. There is a myriad of sports that require explosive force development from a bent-knee position. Think about a rugby player driving forward from the scrum (See Alex’s article for more information on this topic) or perhaps a BJJ fighter using a sprawl and then a take-down. As I have mentioned many times before in this conversation, pause squatting trains your stability and ability to explode out of the sticking point of a squat. Getting better at this means you will become more explosive in sport.

You can integrate and program pause squats as you would normally program squats, however reps above 5 are not recommended. Try 5 sets x 3 reps at 70% with a 3 second pause, or use RPE or auto regulation based on the individual.

To answer the initial question posed at the start of this article once again: Pause squats, worth it or wasteful?

Worth it. It’s cheap and effective. So why wouldn’t you?

Coaching or programming enquiries contact us via Facebook 

For a FREE 6 week squat everyday program check this post: https://ascensionperformancelabs.wordpress.com/2016/09/06/free-squat-everyday-program/

Cam & Chris

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FREE Squat Everyday Program

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Squat everyday – “Bulgarian style of training.”

Website: www.aplabs.com.au

Facebook: Ascension Performance Labs

Instagram: @ascension_performance_labs / @cam.j.burnside

Arguably one of the most popular training styles going around at the moment. The correct combination of high frequency and high intensity can mean the difference between improvement and overtraining.

Program notes:

This is a 6-week squat everyday program designed to be used in conjunction with regular training (e.g. upper body and lower body days), working to a max daily.

 Squatting everyday has become quite popular in sports such as Olympic weightlifting and powerlifting due to the success some have had with this style of training.

Reasons why this program can work:

  • Increased frequency, therefore increasing practice of the movement and skill acquisition.

  • Handling heavier weight more often, which can increase confidence.

  • Overreaching, this is a variable used in training to cause you to train slightly above your ability in order to achieve maximal return before a recovery period.

 The program undulates from day to day and week to week, cycling variations in tempo / isometrics / lift variation and intensity to allow for progression.

Key concepts:

  • There are 2 waves of 3 weeks within this program; the first wave is focused on TUT and positions, the second wave focuses on intensity.

  • This would be best run in conjugation with a complete program, also training pull variations and pressing variations.

  • Perform Hip / Thoracic mobility daily.

  • Always keep reps clean, don’t go past the point of technical breakdown.

  • Understand that not everyday will be a PB and a “MAX” is for the day not an all time max, make smart weight jumps.

  • Warm up is critical and making quality jumps in weight is the key, use a belt unless it says beltless.

*Work up to a “Daily Max” or new PB every session

Wave 1

W1 D1:

Squat x 1 @ 7:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W1 D 2:

Front Squat x 1 @ 3:1:X (Top single only)

W1 D 3:

Squat x 3 x 3 @ ~60%

W1 D 4:

Squat x 1 @ 3:7:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W1 D5:

Squat (Beltless) x 1 (Drop 20% 2 x 3)

W1 D6:

Front Squat x 1 (Drop 20% 2 x 3)

 W1 D7:

Body Weight Squat x 100

W2 D1:

Squat x 1 @ 5:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W2 D 2:

Front Squat x 1 @ 3:4:X (Top single only)

W2 D 3:

Squat x 4 x 2 @ ~60%

W2 D 4:

Squat x 1 @ 2:5:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W2 D5:

Squat (Beltless) x 1 (Drop 20% 2 x 3)

W2 D6:

Front Squat x 1 (Drop 20% 2 x 3)

W2 D7:

Body Weight Squat x 100

W3 D1:

Squat x 1 @ 3:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W3 D 2:

Front Squat x 1 @ 3:7:X (Top single only)

W3 D 3:

Squat x 1 x 8 @ ~60%

W3 D 4:

Squat x 1 @ 2:7:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W3 D5:

Squat (Beltless) x 1 (Drop 20% 2 x 3)

W3 D6:

Front Squat x 1 (Drop 20% 2 x 3)

W3 D7:

Body Weight Squat x 100

*Work up to a “Daily Max” or new PB every session

Wave 2

W4 D1:

Squat (beltless) x 1 @ 3:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W4 D 2:

Squat x 1 @ 5:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W4 D 3:

Squat x 1 @ 2:10:X (Top single only)

W4 D 4:

Pin Squat x 4 x 3 (Ascending weight)

W4 D5:

Squat x 3 x 3 @ ~50-70%

W4 D6:

Squat x 1 (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W4 D7:

Body Weight Squat (Optional)

W5 D1:

Squat (beltless) x 1 (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W5 D 2:

Squat x 1 @ 4:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W5 D 3:

Squat x 1 @ 2:10:X (Top single only)

W5 D 4:

Pin Squat x 3 x 4 (Ascending weight)

W5 D5:

Squat x 3 x 3 @ ~50-70%

W5 D6:

Squat x 1 (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W5 D7:

Body Weight Squat (Optional)

W6 D1:

Squat (beltless) x 1 (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W6 D 2:

Squat x 1 @ 3:0:X (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W6 D 3:

Squat x 1 @ 2:10:X (Top single only)

W6 D 4:

Pin Squat x 6 x 2 (Ascending weight)

W6 D5:

Squat x 3 x 3 @ ~50-70%

W6 D6:

Squat x 1 (Drop 10% x 1 x 2)

W6 D7:

Body Weight Squat (Optional)

Test you max back and front squats the coming week.